Be Prepared and Stay Safe During an Electrical Storm While out at Sea

 

If you spent enough time in a boat, chances are that you have been caught out in a severe thunderstorm…

Lightning can be powerful, dangerous and highly unpredictable – according to NASA, a single lightning strike can release power to the value of a trillion watts. This is the equivalent of the power generated by one million yachts (assuming the average large superyacht produces 1000 kW of electricity).

Even though the odds of being struck by lightning are in your favour (about one out of every 1,000 boats), lightning deaths and injuries are on the rise, primarily because there are more boaters, and bigger boats, out at sea. With more people working out at sea, and boating becoming a fast-growing recreational activity, the need for boating safety and preparedness is more important than ever.

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NTSB conclude that lack of Safety Management System played significant role in collision of Peter F Gellatly Tug

An investigation by The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) into the case of the Peter F Gellatly in New Jersey – a collision that caused an estimated $2.7 million of damage – indicates that where a safety management system (SMS) or similar program had been in place, it could have prevented the incident from occurring.

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Human Factors And Safety Management

Human error is the single most serious threat to maritime safety. As Human Factors are considered a primary contributing factor to incidents and accidents it conversely offers the potential to contribute significant improvements to maritime safety. The term human factor refers to the wide range of issues affecting how people perform tasks in their work and non-work environments.

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Boating Equipment That Will Keep You Safe In The Water

When planning a trip, make sure you always carry the right safety equipment and that it is in good working order. This means you must regularly inspect, service and update it. Safety equipment should be stored in easily accessible places and everyone aboard the boat should know where it is stored and how to use it correctly. These vital bits of safety equipment will keep you and your crew safe aboard your vessel.

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A Maritime Culture That Embraces Safety

The safety of employees is one of the most, if not the most, important concerns for maritime companies. Crew face day-to-day perils that are not encountered by the average office worker. The industry has made great strides in improving safety over the years through improved training programs and safety policies. All of these initiatives combine to create a maritime culture that embraces safety.

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Empowering Your Crew

Developing and creating a workplace filled with happy people isn’t as difficult as you might think. When your able to keep the same crew on board long term they work like a team and the performance improvement is evident. Building strong teams starts from the top. You have to have leadership; it has to filter down so that people respect their leader. The purpose of team building is to find the joy of working together and strengthens the common goal among every­one.

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Assessing Risk

When completing a risk assessment for your vessel operation keep in mind the results of the follow survey conducted by Chicago economist and author of Freakonomics, Stephen Levitt. He studied surveys in which people were asked to compare risks and concluded, “Most people are pretty terrible at risk assessment. They tend to overstate the risk of dramatic and unlikely events at the expense of more common and boring (if equally devastating) events.

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