Cheeki Rafiki update – Owner receives suspended sentence

Mr Justice Teare has called on the maritime regulatory authorities to tighten the rules governing the inspection of yachts.
The Cheeki Rafiki lost its keel as the crew were returning the 40ft yacht from Antigua to the UK in May 2014, they encountered trouble 1,000 miles from the United States with all four crew members tragically losing their lives.
In sentencing the owner of Cheeki Rafki, Douglas Innes, the judge told the father-of-two that ‘cost-cutting had led his actions, and his failure to have his yacht surveyed was a serious act of negligence’.

Implementing a Fatigue Management Program

A Human Factors Dimension to Your SMS

The need to have a Fatigue Management Plan (FMP), which is often viewed as a daunting task for operators of all sizes and complexities. In reality though, if seen as an extension of your existing SMS, the challenge is not as big as you might think. And, an FMP delivers many benefits with minimal impact to your business workflows.

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Biologists Conclude that Fish feel Pain

It is a long held traditional belief that fish do not feel pain the way that humans do, largely due to the fact that they have unsophisticated nervous systems, and lack brains complex enough to generate a conscious awareness of pain. However, after extensive research, fish biologists around the world have put together considerable evidence to indicate that fish do, in fact, feel pain.
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What you need to Know about Dripless Shaft Seals

There are several types of seals, which are divided into two key groups – face seals and lip seals.
Both use an articulated rubber sleeve to keep the water out, and are similar in appearance, but lip seals seal via a lip, or sometimes two, whereas a face seal uses a collar that attaches to a surface on the end of the articulated hose.
FACE SEALS

Considered the most efficient way to seal a shaft, the PSS (Packless Sealing System) shaft seal is a mechanical face seal, which uses the seal created between the flat surfaces of the rotating stainless steel rotor and the stationary carbon flange. The carbon flange is attached to the stern tube via an articulated rubber bellows. The carbon flange contacts a stainless steel rotor that fits securely around the shaft, and is fastened on with grub screws and seals via two O-rings sunken into its bore. The bellows is installed on the stern tube and is then compressed a set distance by the stainless collar, creating a solid and even seal between the carbon flange and the stainless rotor.

LIP SEALS

Volvo Rubber Stuffing Box

Volvo Penta’s solution is commonly called a ‘rubber stuffing box’, and is quick and easy to install, and takes up minimal space, as it combines the rubber hose with a lip seal in one assembly, with no moving parts. It has an internal, water-lubricated bearing and lip seals which must be greased annually. It comes with a single, wide hose clip, secured with machine screws, to clamp on to the stern tube. As it does not have a pressurised water feed, after launch, it must be ‘burped’ to remove air.

Tides marine Sure Seal and seriesOne

This is a propeller shaft sealing, which is suitable for a wide range of shaft speeds and ambient operating temperatures, and commonly fitted to power boats, yachts and commercial crafts. Created from fiber-reinforced composite material that is non-corrosive, it is strong, durable and practical, as there are no moving parts. A pressurised cooling water supply is required to lubricate the lip seal and alignment bearing in the seal head. The seriesOne model is produced in the same way as the Sure Seal, yet is designed for smaller, single-engine vessels with stainless steel propeller shafts.

Biofouling and its Implications on Marine Health, Boat Safety and Australia’s Biosecurity

Biological invasions are widespread throughout the world’s oceans, with many of these invasions occurring as a result of human-mediated mechanisms.

Marine vessels are largely responsible for facilitating the movement of aquatic pest species across bioregions, as small marine animals and plants easily attach to the submerged surfaces of a vessel, as it moves through the water.

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Tragedy aboard the fishing vessel, Louisa (SY30), should be a reminder that fatigue can kill

Back in April 2016, the fishing vessel, Louisa (SY30), encountered a tragedy, with the unfortunate drowning of its skipper and two of his crew.

Having worked a long day, the skipper and his crew retired for bed for the night, anchoring the vessel close to the shore in Mingulay Bay in the Outer Hebrides. In the early hours of the following morning, they were awoken to the vessel sinking. While able to escape to the aft deck, put on lifejackets and activate an EPIRB, they were unable to inflate the life raft in time in order to disembark the vessel and reach safety.  While one member of the crew was able to survive, two crewmen and the skipper were found unresponsive and later declared deceased.

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